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20120926
20121004
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
new institutions. he began to move a forward after decades of dictatorship. chris stevens love his work. he took pride in the country he served anti sought dignity in the people that he met. two weeks ago, he traveled to establish a new cultural center and build a hospital. that is when the compound came under attack, along with three of his colleagues, chris was killed in the city that he helped to save. he was 52 years old. a study this story because chris stevens embody the best of america. like his fellow foreign service officers, he built divisions -- he built bridges across oceans. he is deeply invested in the vision that the united nations represents. he acted with humility, but he also stood up for a set of principles. a belief that individuals should be free to determine their own destiny and live with liberty, and dignity, justice, and opportunities. the attacks on the civilians in benghazi were attacks on america. we are grateful for the assistance we receive from the libyan government and from the libyan people. there should be no doubt that we will be relentless in tra
and gentleman, i would like to begin today by telling you about an american named chris stevens. chris was born in a town called grass valley, california, the son of a lawyer and a musician. as a young man, chris joined the peace corps, and taught english in morocco. and he came to love and respect the people of north africa and the middle east. he would carry that commitment throughout his life. as a diplomat, he worked from egypt to syria, from saudi arabia to libya. he was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked -- tasting the local food, meeting as many people as he could, speaking arabic, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, arriving on a cargo ship. as america's representative, he helped the libyan people as they coped with violent conflict, cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision for the future in which the rights of all libyans would be respected. and after the revolution, he supported the birth of a new democracy, as libyans held elections, and built new institutions, and began to move forward after dec
stevens, who was killed in libya. on iran, the president said the u.s. would do what they must to prevent iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon. his remarks were about 30 minutes. [applause] >> on behalf of the general assembly, i would be honored to welcome to the united nations, his excellency, barack obama, president of united states of america and invite him to address the assembly. >> mr. president, mr. secretary-general, fellow delegates, ladies and gentlemen, i would like to begin today by telling you about an american named chris stevens. chris was born in a town in california. the son of a lawyer and a musician.
of ambassador chris stevens in libya and three of his diplomatic colleagues. he also made two important points, that americans obviously want to show great religious tolerance for the views of others, and onand wanted to dissociate the united states from that hateful video that insulted the prophet of islam. he said that there are important rights of free speech under the first amendment and we have to protect those rights, and if the government a press free-speech, it makes the world a less free place. he also had a message for iran, that while we want to negotiate through diplomacy if possible, time is not unlimited. that was a warning to the iranian government, which has been obstreperous and very difficult to deal with. i think it was a very important speech the president gave in new york. host: how about mitt romney? can you assess from what you have heard and hear him write these past few months? is there a romney doctrine on foreign policy? how would you encapsulate it? guest: i don't know if there is a romney doctrine yet. governor romney is a very smart, successful person. my guess is
. the murder of ambassador chris stevens was a despicable act of terrorism, but the right response is to finish the work that chris stevens gave his life to. that is with the vast majority of libyans want to do. if we saw that so inspiring last weekend as they took to the streets, refusing to allow extremists to hijack their chance for democracy. the arabs rain has brought progress in egypt where they have a certain civilian control over the military. where a elections have brought new governments to power and in morocco where there is a new institution and a prime minister appointed on the basis of a popular vote for the first time. even further, somalia has taken the first step forward by electing a new president. there has been progress and none of it would have come about without people standing up last year and demanding change or without this united nations having the courage to respond to their cries. second, there is the argument that the removal of dictators has somehow started to unleash a new wave of violence, extremism, and instability. some argue that in a volatile region, only an
stevens, a voice of reason and conscience. a man of love, a messenger of friendship who came to libya following the outbreak of our freedom revolution. one who touched the people's feelings. who traveled from tripoli to the western mountains and back, and all across libya. chris stevens spoke with everyone in arabic, always smiled, and showed care. this human diplomat has found his place in the consciousness of the libyan people. it was a day of great sadness throughout libya when he was assassinated along with his three aides. we would like to express our deepest concern and condolences to the american people for this great loss. it was a loss for libya, as it was a loss for the united states of america. we stress to the united states, its governments, and its people, this -- catastrophe will only increase our solidarity to entrench the hopes and objectives in which ambassador chris stevens believed, we shall defeat the backward terrorists who do not represent libya, who do not represent islam. islam is a religion of tolerance, peace, and love, just as president obama said, from this
was offered from everyone and from everywhere. among those offering help, was ambassador chris stevens. a voice of reason and conscience, a man of love, a messenger of friendship, who came to libya following the outbreak of our freedom revolution, one who touched the people's feelings, who traveled from tripoli to them western mountains and backe and all across libya. chris stevens spoke to everyone in arabic, always smiled, and showed care. this human diplomat had found his place -- has found his place in the consciousness of the libyan people. it was a day of sadness throughout libya when he was assassinated. along with his three aides. we would like to express our deepest condolences to the american people for this grave loss. it was a loss for libya, as it was a loss for the united states of america. we stress to the united states, its government, and it people that this catastrophe will only increase our solidarity to entrench the hopes and objectives in which ambassador chris stevens believed. we shall the feed -- defeart the backboards plots of the terrorists who do not represe
would make the same statement about the people who were saying, a fastener stevens -- embassador stevens was killed, so let's walk away from libya. i cannot think that is dispensable. you have to say, which elements of pakistan are progressive that do have common interests with us? if we are to look forward to pakistan opening up, and looking forward to pakistan with an energy that is self- sufficient, and an open economy which is less susceptible to extremism in the country, i think we have to do a better job and i think many of the people in this loam have a subtle understanding and to know this, we have to do a better job who are we working with? given these fraught relations of different institutions in the country, who do we choose to work with in which way and how can we modestly work ahead on different kinds of problems? when we say, we will create a strategic partnership in 12 areas, here is agriculture, here is water, and we will do it bilaterally and we will use a one-size-fits-all institutional link, by its very nature, some of these problems are not given to that kind of stru
who led us down in been gauzy, when ambassador stevens was killed. it is not appropriate to somehow blame the state department or the white house for this. obviously, we have to do everything we can to protect our people. president obama got on the phone with the president of egypt and basically said -- you have got to do a better job -- this is my paraphrasing based on what i have read -- but basically, you have got to do a better job. this is a time for americans to band together. we are depending on those diplomats to represent us. host: eric, on the line for democrats. hello. caller: thank you for taking my call. first of all, the gop always says that there is a liberal media, but that cannot be further from the truth, because all media is corporate owned. when you are a tv person, all you are doing is what your boss told you to do. corporations are owned by rich people who, for the most part, are going to be republican, meeting that all media is right wing, or center-right -- i want to talk about iran. mitt romney do not have any reason to run for president. he is not trying to
with ambassador stevens and he was complaining we are offered of these things but the libyans are not taking and they do not know how to incorporate what they are asking for and what we are offering. the question was, what can be done? you have to develop parallel channels. task forces that co around, i think that is the best way to go right now. >> we will take you to kent state university where president obama is campaigning in ohio. it is just about to get underway. ♪ ♪ [cheers] >> hello, kent state! [cheers] hello, ohio. well, let's begin by giving brian a big round of applause. [applause] i think he has some talent. he may be going places. he sounded good appear. - up here. i also wanted to acknowledge your outstanding congressman who is here. and your mayor is here. and his wife is here. it is good to see all of you. thank you. thank you. now, let me say this. unless you live under a rock or you did not pay your cable bill, you probably are aware there is an election going on right now in ohio. i was telling the story about my campaign manager, and he was visiting with a young coup
? >> my name is steven sshore. there were two swing states you did not talk about -- missouri and in. are those those couptwo in the romney camp. >> maybe people on the panel would disagree. there is no evidence that obama is within shouting distance in indiana. the best he has done in missouri is to be four or five points down. missour is interesting. there are demographic and geographical ships that are taking place that seemed to make it more conservative rather than less. that is unusual for states these days. even though it is within margin, i think most people see that margin as getting much wider this year and the direction of the gop. >> people often point to wake county in north carolina as a county that is making our state more democrat-leading. people come to wake county from somewhere else. in general, if they are coming from the northeast, that could theoretically make a state like pennsylvania more competitive as people go to northern virginia. now, could still be true even if pennsylvania is overwhelmingly democratic. >> basically, what has happened is we have gone fro
to an all-time high i would say. have a conversation with stuart stevens and then a conversation with mike leavitt. it is just two different worlds. i honestly believe it would not be that the similar period a very different conversation that the one you would have with jack lew it or whoever is thinking through what obama would do in november/december of this year and for six months of next year. i do not think it is impossible. i think maybe it is just the way we will conduct ourselves, which is pick extremely quickly after election day. i do not buy the argument the partisanship is so bad. that will be an unusual situation, what we have not had in a long time. in any case, i think -- it is not going to be a lot of clues about this over the next five weeks, i do not think. >> which is unfortunate. >> congressman gordon. >> the partnership -- partisanship is very bad and will take leadership to get through that. going back to the ambassador's comments about how their romney would govern. i completely agree with the deal making aspect of working with congress. we saw that as governor of ma
christopher stevens and three others. these images echo the worst -- the recall those moments in 1979 with the taking of american hostages at the embassy in iran. u.s. taxpayers as an enormous 1.6 billion doris to egypt, -- $1.6 billion to egypt, which is now run by a former member of the muslim brotherhood. should the u.s. give up foreign aid to these nations, mr. sadler? >> no. not now, we have a fledgling government being formed a. with egypt withholding funds, the editorial board agreed is time for us to stop the old on that aid. it is in our best interests to stay involved. if we do not stay involved, russia, china, and other countries with in this world will i do not think to cut off the aid. >> mr. cruz? >> this is another area of clear disagreement. we should not be funding those who are contrary to our interest. the only justification for continuing that aid or any portion of it is it to protect national security interests of the united states. we should use that aid as extensive leverage to protect national security interest. we should not be writing a blank check. lookit th
-- you can join the conversation on twitter, facebook or send us an e-mail at journal@cspan.org. steven haze has this editorial. talking about the attacks and libya. joe is on the phone on the republican line. our third party is still relevant? caller: no. ross perot had a wonderful opportunity to open up people's mines and he talked about things. the problem with that is he is a billionaire just like everybody else. it was a business decision. at the end of the day he is back to eric -- back to making money or the rest of us have to decide whether we can pay house note, carnot, pay for our kid's education just to get through the day. if he were serious about a third party, then he should have stayed there to have a third party. i voted the man not the party. when i look at what mr. romney is doing and mr. ryan is doing as opposed to what i already know about president obama, i am proud of him -- the things he is talking about as opposed to what they are talking about is about the rich getting richer as opposed to all of us being in this together. i do not have a problem paying more tax
and setting up a series of public health initiatives for basically eliminating cholera as a threat. >> steven johnson is our guest depth."ay on 'in- he will get popular culture and computer networking and politics, i've at noon eastern on "book tv." journal"ington continues. host: james montoya is our guest. what is the college board? guest: a membership organization of over 6000 educational institution knows, organizations that are all focused on connecting students to college success. host: and the purpose of the s.a.t.? when it was first created? guest: the s.a.t. has been around for decades. the idea was to create a more level playing field for students, but sickly for those that lived in axa's that might not have access to the interview campus. it provided an opportunity for us nationally to have an examination that all colleges could use to help them in the admissions process. host: there are now three sections of it. guest: the third section is been in place about eight years. the s.a.t. is measuring those skills that are necessary for college success -- reading, writing, and mathemati
reading and re- imagining of other people's ideas. >> steven johnson is our guest next sunday. he will look at the cyberworld, popular culture, and computer networking and politics, live at noon eastern on "book tv" on c- span2. >> "washington journal" continues. host: a preview of the supreme court term with jess bravin, that beginning today. themes are merging? guest: big cases involving same- sex marriage as well as the voting rights act. expect those cases to be added later on in the year. so far they have not. the cases that have been placed on the docket, the biggest is affirmative action. that's coming up on october 10. the first time in nearly a decade the court as look at whether universities can use racial preferences in admissionss. the other cases are interesting and important, but they don't have the cataclysmic reputation of the cases we had last year involving the immigration and health-care. host: i was going to ask what you learned from last year's term. and the dynamic of the court now moving forward. guest: no one that i know of expected the health care case to
to come to these things. you took a murky topic and made it clear. as the attorney of steven colbert, will he use that money to try to win the emmy from jon stewart? my real question is -- it is difficult to change. this is a time when things are so polarized. with new technology where everybody has their own axe to grind, address that as a dissuading factor. if i go home tonight, i can do whatever i want to as many people as i can reach. that is different from the time of jefferson. ben franklin are someone only needed to set that in print and now all you need to is to press a button. how does that fit into a campaign? >> obama cannot raise the money without technology. the net is different from a newspaper. you can say whatever you want an infinite number of people can read that. no one will know you wrote that unless you put money behind it or have a way of promoting it. there are similar barriers. you cannot say you're printing press is as important as someone else's printing press. it is more complicated. >> question surprised me. going to say we took a simple subject and made
on the consulate resulted in the death of the american ambassador christopher stevens and three others. these images echo the worst -- the recall those moments in 1979 with the taking of american hostages at the embassy in iran. u.s. taxpayers gave an enormous $1.6 billion to egypt, which is now run by a former member of the muslim brotherhood. should the u.s. give up foreign aid to these nations, mr. sadler? >> no. not now, we have a fledgling government being formed a. with egypt withholding funds, the editorial board agreed is time for us to stop the old on that aid. -- to stop the hold on that day. it is in our best interests to stay involved. if we do not stay involved, russia, china, and other countries with in this world will i do not think to cut off the aid. >> mr. cruz? >> this is another area of clear disagreement. we should not be funding those who are contrary to our interest. the only justification for continuing that aid or any portion of it is it to protect national security interests of the united states. we should use that aid as extensive leverage to protect national
and killed four americans, including chris stevens. we could get more on that today. also going on on our companion network c-span 2 right now, on land security secretary is discussing cyber security threats. at a summit taking place in the nation's capital. the center is holding a session and we will return to live coverage of that on c-span 2. counter prescription drugs is the topic of a conference taking place on c-span 3 allah de. the partnership for sick medicines is hosting the conference. you can see live coverage on that on our campaign and network c-span 3. >> we are like your the pentagon for a briefing with leon panetta and canadian minister of national defense, peter mackay. this briefing expected to get underway in just a moment. very quickly, some other program in coming up on c-span today, we will hear from yemen's president at 1:00 p.m. eastern. he is here in washington set to speak at the woodrow wilson center. he is the president of yemen, he took over in february after an uprising forced the previous president to step down after 33 years in power. we will have his addre
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)